In this case, he traces how the specter of the slave ship impacted African communities, the ship captains and sailors, the men and women pressed into slavery, and the abol. To punish rebels, captains resorted to thumbscrews, red-hot pokers, strangling, the severing of limbs and more. Socially, with its whips and chains, it was a floating prison, which acclimated its passengers to the harsh world they would encounter on American and Caribbean plantations. He is the author of numerous prize-winning books, including, “The year 1700 was a symbolic beginning of the drama in both Britain and America. The Slave Ship a Human History Marcus Rediker is critical about the description of the resemblance that modern international trade exudes. In Rediker’s case, the result is a book which was “a painful book to write” and, Rediker hopes, “a painful b, Marcus Rediker describes his most recent book as “[a]n ethnography of the slave ship.” (12.) The financial incentives to. Rediker looks not at that bigger picture but at the slave ship itself, as a microeconomy where the captain was chief executive, jailer, accountant, paymaster and disciplinarian, exercising these roles by maintaining, from his spacious captain’s cabin in a very unspacious ship, the mystique of what later military leaders would call command isolation. I began this book with trepidation, as perhaps most of its readers do; the subject is so horrific and so grim I wasn't sure I wanted to know more about it. Print. What he merely touches upon is that the slave trade happened because of the complicity of the African tribal leaders and merchants. I read the kindle edition, and being a student of history this book contains excellent descriptive stories of the horrid experiences on board the slave ship. Rather than talk about the trade in the abstract, focusing on the slave ship as the point where all these things met allow him to emphasize the (in)human dimension of the slave trade. The book can be hard to read, emotionally speaking. One is the highly globalized nature of the business, and even of the ships’ construction: he traces how one major British slave-ship owner ordered his vessels built in New England, which had the best timber, but sent the builder nails, rope and anchors from Liverpool, where their price was lower. What a goddamned amazing and horrifying book to read. This complex tissue of normality makes one wonder what aspects of our own everyday business-as-usual people will, a century or two from now, be considered as horrendous as we think the slave trade was. Not only was the business a booming one, it was, until pesky abolitionists started making a fuss in the 1780s, considered highly respectable, as central to the Atlantic economy as is something like oil today. The Slave Ship: A Human History. His vignettes of first person experiences as merchant, Captain, Mate, trader, sailor and jailor are terrifying in their matter-of-fact acceptance of the daily horror. In many ways, this develops in deep, human detail a theme from C.L.R. Rediker notes that while many histories of the slave trade … What attracted you to the study of early Atlantic maritime history? The legendary LRB Mousemat is back! The documents mounted up because the transport of chained and shackled Africans was once so central a part of world commerce. The author Marcus Rediker is a well recognised scholar working in the area of maritime history who has produced a clear, coherent and engaging examination of the role of the slave ship in the slave trade covering the years 1700 to 1808. The expansion of the "shipmate" concept into a root-formation of resistant Afro-diasporic culture and politics transforms an otherwise horrifying chronicle into something paradoxically optimistic, and militantly liberatory. “The Slave Ship: A Human History” is a revelation of Marcus’ effort of rigorous research of more than thirty years through the passage of countless maritime archives, records from court, entries in myriad journals and diaries and, most importantly, a thorough first-hand account which culminated into a history lost and forgotten with a few of the shivering accounts of tearful incidents and revelations that can bring shiver … This was a very painful read. This was a good book if for no other reason then it addresses a seldom talked about aspect of history. This is the first book I've read focusing solely on the transportation part of the transatlantic slave trade and it was fascinating (and horrifying) to read about the way all the parts of the industry (merchants, ship captains, sailors, African traders) came together to create this terrible system. Luckily for us, February brings a... To see what your friends thought of this book. Amazing work of scholarship on the slave ship as essentially the "shop floor" of Atlantic capitalism. Most spasms of cruelty in history we know about largely through the testimony of victims. December 13th 2007 Hundreds of slavers would follow from these ports and from others in the coming century.10”, Readers' Most Anticipated Books of February. A terror-filled floating hell on Earth. In “The Slave Ship”, Marcus Rediker undertakes a thoroughgoing examination of all aspects, both human and material, social and political, of the instruments of the “Middle Passage” that in thousands of voyages across the Atlantic ferried over 12.3 million human beings from freedom to slavery in the Western Hemisphere. There are few accounts of this voyage by slaves, and historians are now not 100 percent sure of the authenticity of the most famous of them, the 18th-century autobiography of Olaudah Equiano. He delves deep in describing the respectability that today’s international business has as one of the globalized nature that demonstrates development. This is based upon the audio download from [. The whole book is tragedy, and super frustrating to read, but the author does a great job synthesizing a lot of sources to clearly and humanely describe it all. 2 right. I can not put into words, though, why I didn't love this book. The Slave Ship itself is the focus of Marcus Redikers well written and thoughtful book on the British and American slave trade of the 18th Century: the ships themselves, the people who owned them, their captains, officers and ordinary sailors aswell as the enslaved Africans. Economically, the slave ship was a means of transporting some of the ocean’s most valuable cargo. A second claim to novelty is conveyed by the book's subtitle: Rediker proposes a “human history” of the slave trade in terms of individual experience, in contrast to (and as an implicit critique of) the recent concentration upon quantitative approaches. The research for this book includes several sources exploring the impact of the Middle Passage including well-known works like Rootsand Amistad to more general books like The African Slave Trade and Still I Rise. A big recruiter was hunger and poverty; sailors were among the poorest occupational groups of the 18th century. There is no great trove of memoirs by retired concentration camp guards. If the Africans did not promote slavery for their own greed and or tribal revenge, would the Black slave trade have existed to the degree in which it did? At times, it seems like the slave trade was a kind of gold rush, luring would-be capitalists over the moral line, as surely as they crossed the Tropic of Cancer. At the end of May 1700, the Eliza, Captain John Dunn, set sail from Liverpool for an unspecified destination in Africa and again to Barbados, where he delivered 180 slaves. The author approached the slave ship from the perspective of the captains, the crew, the merchants, the slaves, and abolitionists. Just as corporate officers now get stock options, slave-ship officers received the extra compensation of a few “privilege” slaves they were permitted to buy, transport and sell for their own profit. What he merely touches upon is that the slave trade happened because of the complicity of the African tribal leaders and merchants. And finally, those who succeeded in the business could seamlessly make the transition to politics, the way tycoons still do: former slave-ship captains sat in both the British House of Commons and the United States Senate (James D’Wolf of Rhode Island). ), and the investors are also here. It draws on a remarkable array of sources: memoirs, eyewitness accounts, government documents, merchants’ record books and the database of slaving voyages compiled in the 1990s by a group of … Replace your tatty old one with the fresh, updated version. The manner in which the people died, however is typically glossed over in other slave histories, and I think Rediker did a fine delicate job painting such a grim picture. Review of: The Slave Ship: A Human History, Marcus Rediker, John Murray, 2008, 464 pp. by Marcus Rediker ‧RELEASE DATE: Oct. 8, 2007. Our normal picture of an 18th-century sailing vessel is of one filled with hopeful immigrants. The financial incentives to become involved in the slave trade are detailed, as are the tremendous hazards. Book Review “The Slave Ship: A Human History” by Marcus Rediker ISBN 978-0—670-01823-9 2007, Viking Penguin It’s About the People and their Stories, not the Shipwreck ©2008 Fred L. McGhee Ten years after my exhortation to move the field “towards a postcolonial nautical archaeology” (McGhee 1998), it has been interesting to watch developments within nautical archaeology unfold. Just a moment while we sign you in to your Goodreads account. Macaulay’s was a remarkable feat of investigative reporting, the only time a prominent abolitionist crossed the Atlantic on a slave ship, taking notes. It could have been as simple as his writing style didn't have much imagination. (accessed November 22, 2016). Rediker emphasises the role of the slave ship as a transformative vehicle which took on board millions of multiethnic people from Africa and through the application of brutal technologies and the application of a rigid hierarchical syst. Rediker is thorough in his account of the business of buying people; from shore to shore he gives the reader a vivid idea of the horrors so many endured. Eric ... now you can buy official London Review of Books and London Review Bookshop products online, shipped anywhere in the world. "The Slave Ship: A Human History (review)." I appreciated his inclusion of ship plans, clarifying the different slaver sizes, and discussing more than just "lots of people died." The author Marcus Rediker is a well recognised scholar working in the area of maritime history who has produced a clear, coherent and engaging examination of the role of the slave ship in the slave trade covering the years 1700 to 1808. But before 1807, ships carried well over three times as many enslaved Africans across the ocean to British colonies as they did Europeans. The author approached the slave ship from the perspective of the captains, the crew, the merchants, the slaves, and abolitionists. the slave ship a human history Dec 06, 2020 Posted By Stephenie Meyer Publishing TEXT ID 8308c14b Online PDF Ebook Epub Library The Slave Ship A Human History INTRODUCTION : #1 The Slave Ship ~ Last Version The Slave Ship A Human History ~ Uploaded By Stephenie Meyer, the slave ship was the instrument of historys greatest forced migration and a key to the It could have been as simple as his writing style didn't have. 4 (2009): 1041-1042. Our normal picture of an 18th-century sailing vessel is of one filled with hopeful immigrants. This is superb historical writing— with detailed contemporary accounts, the author builds a multi-dimensional picture of the slave ship & the people involved. Marcus Rediker's The Slave Ship: A Human History (Viking, 2007) explores the history of the transatlantic slave trade by concentrating on both the slave ship itself (which Rediker calls "a strange and potent combination of war machine, mobile prison, and factory") and also on the humans who populated the ships and paid for their voyages: the slaves themselves, the common sailors, the captains, and the bankrolling merchants. “Making the slave ship real, ”historian Rediker (History/Univ. I find his scholarship fantastic and the insights in his books useful, thought provoking, and important. How do we deceive ourselves today? Rediker suggests that this should be the case, if historians are to avoid what he calls the occlusion of “pervasive torture and terror” through overly quantitative approaches or other narratives which do not foreground the sheer horror of it all. Rediker points out many others. Rediker suggests that this should be the case, if historians are to avoid what he calls the occlusion of “pervasive torture and terror” through overly quantitative approaches or other narratives which do not foreground the sheer horror of it all. ), and the investors are also here. Of particular note is his emphasis on detailing the lives of individuals in this drama such as an adult female slave who is drowned by lowering her into the sea on a chair by a slaver captain who subsequently laments the loss of a fine chair. Let us know what’s wrong with this preview of, Published As a practitioner of “history from below” who has written several other books about the maritime world of this era, Rediker is sensitive to the ruthless manner in which captains treated common sailors, and to the way that any totalitarian system enlists a lower layer to control those at the very bottom. I liked this book more the further I read into it. Book will recount the bitter human drama aboard slave ships | Editorial | greensboro.com Facebook Our much loved keyboard reference mousemat is back in stock! - PW. The beginning, I found, was a little tedious, but as he moved on through successive chapters the massive edifice of human enterprise and concomitant misery that was the trans-Atlantic slave trade slowly comes into focus. Rediker is very methodical in his approach, selecting one or the other elements of inquiry, examining it in detail and then, movi. It is emotionally wrenching, yet compelling. I find his scholarship fantastic and the insights in his books useful, thought provoking, and important. by Viking Books. The Slave Ship contains a thorough and eerie study of the transatlantic slave trade, the largest forced migration in the history of humanity. I liked this book more the further I read into it. It is thanks to acts of witness by survivors like Primo Levi and Alexander Solzhenitsyn, for instance, that we can begin to picture what life was like in Auschwitz and the gulag. Humanly, the slave ship was the locus of unbelievable cruelty. This is a terrific, engaging book about the slave trade and the ships, captains, merchants, slaves and sailors who made the trade possible. If the Africans did not promote slavery for their own greed and or tribal revenge, would the Black slave. He told lots and lots of stories, which brought their experiences to life, and took all of his stories (seemingly) from first hand accounts. James, Robin Blackburn and others, which positions slavery as central to the historical emergence of a capitalist Western hemisphere -- rather than an unfortunate exception to a linear progressivist historical template. This is the first book I've read focusing solely on the transportation part of the transatlantic slave trade and it was fascinating (and horrifying) to read about the way all the parts of the industry (merchants, ship captains, sailors, African traders) came together to create this terrible system. Much is known of the slave trade and the American plantation complex, but little of the ships that made it all possible. Like the post of concentration-camp commandant, the job bred violence. Rather than reading a good book with a cup of tea in the afternoon, instead they cope with some harmful virus inside their computer. (Both the Nazi and the Soviet camps established such hierarchies among prisoners.) “What a glorious and advantageous trade this is,” wrote James Houston, who worked for a firm of 18th-century slave merchants. “Violence cascaded downward,” he writes, “from captain and officers to sailors to the enslaved.” The slaves got the worst of it, of course, but sailors — who staged many mutinies — were subject to murderous floggings and to a shipboard company-store arrangement that often left naïve deckhands owing money to the captain. Media Reviews "Starred Review. It is a rare, touching moment of human solidarity in an otherwise inhuman story. The basic concept is Twelve Years a Slave meets Star Trek and follows the ordeal of one woman ripped from her brownstone in Brooklyn and thrust into the belly of a ship to be sold on the other side of the galaxy. Rediker has made magnificent use of archival data; his probing, compassionate eye turns up numerous finds that other people who’ve written on this subject, myself included, have missed. When introducing a new primary source, say, the diary of a ship surgeon, Rediker has a tendency to ~set the scene~ like so: I actually listened to this book as an audio, so my experience may be warped. In a haunting discovery, Rediker finds several witnesses who testified that when these injured and penniless sailors lived as vagrants on the streets of Caribbean and North American ports, the local people who took pity and found them food and shelter sometimes included slaves. This was a good book if for no other reason then it addresses a seldom talked about aspect of history. Right off the bat, Rediker has us in a canoe with enslaved Africans traveling toward one of the waiting European many-masted sea-worthy vessels, also called a "Guineaman." In “The Slave Ship”, Marcus Rediker undertakes a thoroughgoing examination of all aspects, both human and material, social and political, of the instruments of the “Middle Passage” that in thousands of voyages across the Atlantic ferried over 12.3 million human beings from freedom to slavery … A HUMAN HISTORY. Although there weren't many (or any) written first-hand accounts by African women, I liked that the author made an effort to include their perspective, especially at the beginning and end of the book. The slave merchants, captains and tavern keepers would conspire to run sailors into debt, and they would either be thrown in jail or sold directly to the slave ship captain. The Slave Ship: A Human History . He clearly understands the "wooden world." In his book he documents the history of the American and British slave ships of … He clearly understands the "wooden world." Sometimes the profits were so enticing. He told lots and lots of stories, which brought their experiences to life, and took all of his stories (seemingly) from first hand accounts. Although there weren't many (or any) written first-hand accounts by African women, I liked that the author made an effort to include their perspective, especi. The Slave Ship: A Human History Written by Marcus Rediker Review by Mike Ashworth Countless thousands of words have been written about the slave trade and the industries built upon its products. We’d love your help. Law R (2008) The Slave Ship: A Human History. Well-researched and brings the horror of this human institution to life. I'm always ambivalent about Rediker's books. 1. The result is gradual buildup of understanding that is built one powerful, illuminating and sickening element at a time. Reading it established a transformative and never to be severed bond with my African ancestors who were cargo in slave ships over a period of four centuries.”— The oldest slave ship ever discovered, which lies in the Channel, still contains artefacts that were exchanged for human lives. The Slave Ship A Human History. He discusses with brutal detail the devastation caused by the slave trade -- whether on the lives of the Africans, the captains, the sailors, merchants, the insurers. Marcus Rediker talked about his book [The Slave Ship: A Human History], published by Viking. It’s very accessible for readers who don’t know much about history. An important book with much information, but piece-meal. Page 352. The research for this book includes several sources exploring the impact of the Middle Passage including well-known works like Rootsand Amistad to more general books like The African Slave Trade and Still I Ris. Goodreads helps you keep track of books you want to read. This is an excellent book. Adam Hochschild, The New York Times Book Review “Searingly brilliant.”—Los Angeles Times Book Review “ I was hardly prepared for the profound emotional impact of The Slave Ship: A Human History. With the slave cargo unloaded, fewer hands were needed to sail the ship back to England; if some of the sailors debarked, fewer would have to be paid. Welcome back. For me, the primary value of this book was in contemplating, as the author states in the introduction, "horrors which have always been, and remain, central to the making of global capitalism." The result is a compelling narrative that exposes the regularised and ordered horrors of the slave trade that leaves a lingering contempt for the way in which capitalism sets aside questions of morality when the opportunity to make vast profits lures investors from both sides of the Atlantic like so many sharks to blood in the water. 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